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PARS

Rethinking Schools editor Wayne Au at Portland conference

in

Dear Portland Area Rethinking Schools friends,

Rethinking Schools and University of Washington (Bothell) professor, Wayne Au, will be a panelist and keynote speaker at this Saturday's conference, "Critical Consciousness in the Classroom: A Multimedia Hip Hop Conference," held at Portland State University.

Wayne is editor or co-editor of several Rethinking Schools books, including Rethinking Multicultural Education, Rethinking Our Classrooms, Vol. 1, and the forthcoming Pencils Down: Rethinking High Stakes Testing and Accountability in Public Schools.

Wayne's talk is titled "Why Hip-hop? Dilemmas in Bridging Youth Culture and the Classroom."

When: Saturday, Feb. 18, 2 pm to 9 pm

Where: PSU Multicultural Center, Rm. 228, Smith Memorial Student Union building

For a conference program and more information: www.Moving2thebeat.com

Bill Bigelow
for the Portland Area Rethinking Schools steering committee

TGIF: Teaching and Organizing for Social Justice

in

Our recent TGIF --

Teaching and Organizing for Social Justice

Friday, January 27th 

Outside as well as inside the classroom, educators and their allies are trying to make the world a better place. We heard about a number of ongoing projects that offer hope and possibilities for involvement. 

Northwest Teaching for Social Justice Conference Planning Committee
On the surface the Northwest Teaching for Social Justice Conference is a finely choreographed flow of conversations and connections. Underneath, it is parallel streams of details: workshop schedules, program printing, lunch logistics, t-shirts sales, tabling set-up, coffee brewing, facilitator support, evaluation gathering.  In October, we will host the 5th annual Northwest Teaching for Social Justice Conference in Portland. We need your help to make it a success.   Elizabeth Schlessman

Social Justice and Early Childhood Education
Geared toward early childhood/primary teachers (pre-K through 3rd), childcare workers, parents and anyone with a stake in the education of young children, this workgroup will focus on ways to teach 3 to 9-year olds with an orientation toward social justice. We'll collectively select topics and our discussions will involve sharing experiences as well as engagement with readings. Initial readings will be drawn from Anti-Bias Education for Young Children and Ourselves and Rethinking Early Childhood Education. Depending on the particular interests of the group, themes might include: developmentally appropriate ways to help children understand/explore race, gender, class, ability and family structure; creating an anti-bias learning community; protecting a place for imaginative play in this era of testing; advocating for early childhood workers; working with and standing by families, etc. We hope that the intensive study and reflection will culminate in a group action that shares our learning with a broader audience and deepens our commitment to this work. Facilitated by Emily Crum (bilingual kindergarten teacher at Alder Elementary) and Laura Czarniecki (preschool teacher at Tulip Tree Preschool).

Oregon Save Our Schools
Oregon Save Our Schools, a grassroots public education activist group uniting parents, educators, and students, is working to keep education public. We are a chapter of Save Our Schools, the group that organized the national march in D.C. last summer, and an affiliate of Parents Across America. In Oregon we focus on educating and fighting corporate education reforms, and are currently looking at the Oregon Education Investment Board's role as they now work on the NCLB waiver and push new legislation. Our guiding principles are: equitable funding for all public school communities; an end to high stakes testing used for the purpose of student, teacher, and school evaluation; teacher, family and community leadership in forming public education policies; and curriculum developed for and by local school communities. A growing activism group, we welcome others concerned about corporate education reform to join our efforts. Susan Barrett

Social Equality Educators
Modeled after the Caucus of Rank-and-File Educators (CORE) that has transformed the Chicago Teachers Union, Social Equality Educators (SEE) is a new rank-and-file organization of educators inside the National Education Association. The first chapter of SEE formed in Seattle in 2009 and there is now an effort underway to start a Portland-area chapter. SEE seeks to transform education in terms that empower students, teachers, and the communities that our public schools serve.  As members of the NEA we understand that the union has a vital role to play in creating an equitable education system.  As educators, we understand the importance of using culturally relevant and holistic curriculum to empower our students. We come together to fight the corporate reform of our schools and to organize for a socially just education system. For more information visit: http://seattlesee.org  Adam Sanchez

“Earth in Crisis” Curriculum Workgroup
Most of what is worth teaching about cannot be found in textbooks. The “Earth in Crisis” Curriculum Workgroup was organized to provide a place for teachers to discuss, develop, and test out curriculum about things that matter in the world. We've been especially focused on environmental justice issues--climate change, water, “extreme energy”--but have met recently to talk about ways to teach the Occupy movement, and we'll be meeting soon to “workshop” curriculum on the financial meltdown. This is a group where we figure out the details of what it means to teach for social justice.   Tim Swinehart and Bill Bigelow

View this information on our website HERE.

TGIF: Teaching and Organizing for Social Justice

in

Our recent TGIF:

  Teaching and Organizing for Social Justice
  Friday, January 27th

Outside as well as inside the classroom, educators and their allies are trying to make the world a better place. We heard about a number of ongoing projects that offer hope and possibilities for involvement. 

Northwest Teaching for Social Justice Conference Planning Committee

On the surface the Northwest Teaching for Social Justice Conference is a finely choreographed flow of conversations and connections. Underneath, it is parallel streams of details: workshop schedules, program printing, lunch logistics, t-shirts sales, tabling set-up, coffee brewing, facilitator support, evaluation gathering.  In October, we will host the 5th annual Northwest Teaching for Social Justice Conference in Portland. We need your help to make it a success.   Elizabeth Schlessman

Social Justice and Early Childhood Education

Geared toward early childhood/primary teachers (pre-K through 3rd), childcare workers, parents and anyone with a stake in the education of young children, this workgroup will focus on ways to teach 3 to 9-year olds with an orientation toward social justice. We'll collectively select topics and our discussions will involve sharing experiences as well as engagement with readings. Initial readings will be drawn from Anti-Bias Education for Young Children and Ourselves and Rethinking Early Childhood Education. Depending on the particular interests of the group, themes might include: developmentally appropriate ways to help children understand/explore race, gender, class, ability and family structure; creating an anti-bias learning community; protecting a place for imaginative play in this era of testing; advocating for early childhood workers; working with and standing by families, etc. We hope that the intensive study and reflection will culminate in a group action that shares our learning with a broader audience and deepens our commitment to this work. Facilitated by Emily Crum (bilingual kindergarten teacher at Alder Elementary) and Laura Czarniecki (preschool teacher at Tulip Tree Preschool).

Oregon Save Our Schools

Oregon Save Our Schools, a grassroots public education activist group uniting parents, educators, and students, is working to keep education public. We are a chapter of Save Our Schools, the group that organized the national march in D.C. last summer, and an affiliate of Parents Across America. In Oregon we focus on educating and fighting corporate education reforms, and are currently looking at the Oregon Education Investment Board's role as they now work on the NCLB waiver and push new legislation. Our guiding principles are: equitable funding for all public school communities; an end to high stakes testing used for the purpose of student, teacher, and school evaluation; teacher, family and community leadership in forming public education policies; and curriculum developed for and by local school communities. A growing activism group, we welcome others concerned about corporate education reform to join our efforts. Susan Barrett

Social Equality Educators

Modeled after the Caucus of Rank-and-File Educators (CORE) that has transformed the Chicago Teachers Union, Social Equality Educators (SEE) is a new rank-and-file organization of educators inside the National Education Association. The first chapter of SEE formed in Seattle in 2009 and there is now an effort underway to start a Portland-area chapter. SEE seeks to transform education in terms that empower students, teachers, and the communities that our public schools serve.  As members of the NEA we understand that the union has a vital role to play in creating an equitable education system.  As educators, we understand the importance of using culturally relevant and holistic curriculum to empower our students. We come together to fight the corporate reform of our schools and to organize for a socially just education system. For more information visit: http://seattlesee.org  Adam Sanchez

“Earth in Crisis” Curriculum Workgroup

Most of what is worth teaching about cannot be found in textbooks. The “Earth in Crisis” Curriculum Workgroup was organized to provide a place for teachers to discuss, develop, and test out curriculum about things that matter in the world. We've been especially focused on environmental justice issues--climate change, water, “extreme energy”--but have met recently to talk about ways to teach the Occupy movement, and we'll be meeting soon to “workshop” curriculum on the financial meltdown. This is a group where we figure out the details of what it means to teach for social justice.   Tim Swinehart and Bill Bigelow

 

Rethinking Schools winter issue is available

in

Dear Portland Area Rethinking Schools friends,

Below is an announcement about the new winter issue of Rethinking Schools magazine. Please check it out. There are a number of places in Portland that carry Rethinking Schools: Broadway Books, Alberta St. Coop Grocery, the Concordia New Seasons, People's Food Coop, Powells downtown, and Rich's Cigars downtown. Better yet, if you don't already subscribe, please do.

Bill Bigelow, for the PARS Steering Committee

From: Kris Collett <kris@rethinkingschools.org>
Date: January 5, 2012 2:27:52 PM PST
Subject: [National Network of Activist Teachers] Rethinking Schools winter issue is available

Rethinking Schools Special Issue: Stop the School-to-Prison Pipeline


An exclusive interview with Michelle Alexander, author of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, centers Rethinking Schools' special winter issue. Our focus is the school-to-prison pipeline and how to stop it in our classrooms, our schools, and our communities.

"Arresting Development: Zero Tolerance and the Criminalization of Children" reviews the history, impact, and future of zero tolerance policies. Our investigative reporter is Annette Fuentes, author of Lockdown High: When the Schoolhouse Becomes a Jailhouse.

In "The Classroom-to-Prison Pipeline," master teacher and RS editor Linda Christensen faces a classroom revolt. She realizes that opting out of this "pipeline" requires us to continue to rethink our classrooms.

Then Jody Sokolower, policy and production editor, discusses how teachers can support students with incarcerated parents and other family members.

And much, much more.

This is one of our most exciting and thought-provoking issues. Don't miss it.
-- 
Kris Collett
Marketing Director
Rethinking Schools
1001 E. Keefe Ave.
Milwaukee, WI  53212

www.rethinkingschools.org
(o) 414-964-9646
(c) 414-807-5193

Connect with us...
...on Twitter @rethinkschools
...on Facebook www.facebook.com/rethinkingschools
...at our blog http://rethinkingschoolsblog.wordpress.com/

To Subscribe to the National Network of Activist Teachers, send an email to nnat-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Occupy the Holidays with Rethinking Schools

in

Dear Portland Area Rethinking Schools friends,

Below is a holiday offer from Rethinking Schools magazine. Please consider "feeding two birds with one hand" this season, as you support the important social justice work of Rethinking Schools at the same time you buy gifts for friends and loved ones.

Many thanks.

Bill Bigelow
for the Portland Area Rethinking Schools steering committee

______________________________________________

Dear Rethinking Schools friends:

We're jumping on the holiday discount bandwagon (or should I say toboggan?) with a special offer for our friends.

The perfect gifts are ones that have the potential to change the world, and we can help you deliver. Get a 25% discount on subscriptions or any of our award-winning books until December 31, 2011. Use discount code 7BHL11 when ordering at our website.

Need some gift ideas?

Every issue of Rethinking Schools magazine offers vivid examples of teaching and thoughtful analyses of education policy issues. Give your loved one a print or digital subscription, and save up to 60% off the cover price when you use discount code 7BHL11.

Rethinking Popular Culture and Media is our newest book and biggest seller. In a world saturated by corporate influences that promote values of consumption, competition, and contempt for equality, this collection of essays is an invaluable resource in the classroom or at the dinner table.

The revised and expanded The New Teacher Book continues to be an inspiring but practical collection for new and veteran teachers alike. Give the gift that noted author and educator Christine Sleeter calls "indispensable."

Rethinking Multicultural Education is another of our bestsellers and for good reason. It is a collection of our best articles on race and culture in the classroom. The essays go beyond heroes and holidays to reclaim multicultural education as part of our struggle for justice and against racism.

Finally, for the language arts lover in your life, there is no better gift than Linda Christensen's Teaching for Joy and Justice. With concrete examples, and powerful stories from both teachers and students, this gift will delight the receiver.

Jump on that toboggan with us by giving gifts like these that support your values and make our world a better place. And don't forget, use code 7BHL11 to get 25% off the retail price until December 31, 2011.

Have a wonderful holiday season, and many thanks for your continued support.

In solidarity,

Kris Collett
Marketing/Outreach for Rethinking Schools

Read and subscribe to Rethinking Schools magazine, and purchase Rethinking Schools publications at www.rethinkingschools.org. || Follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/rethinkschools. || Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/rethinkingschools. || Opt-in to our email notices at www.rethinkingschools.org/about/join_e-list.asp.

Rethinking Schools is a nonprofit publishing and advocacy organization. We rely on the generosity of our donors and volunteers.
 

Join our campaign to reOccupy Education. Please read this statement from Portland teachers and sign our online petition.

 

Statement on Academic Freedom and Teachers’ Professional Judgment

We, the undersigned educators, are dismayed by the recent incident at Astor School where members of the Occupy Portland Panel, an educational branch of the Occupy Portland movement, were thrown out of a classroom of sixth and seventh graders after they began talking to students about U.S. foreign wars and house foreclosures. After a school employee interrupted the discussion, the Occupy Portland guests were told by the teacher that, “the school district is not comfortable with us having this conversation,” and then escorted out of the building. The decision to end the panel came from Astor Principal Karl Newsome. Portland Public Schools spokesman Matt Shelby is quoted in the Portland Mercury backing the principal’s decision citing a district procedure that calls for principals to sign off when outside groups are brought in and asserting that the teacher should have let parents know before inviting the Occupy Portland Panel to Astor.

We reject the idea that teachers would need to notify parents or obtain principal approval before bringing Occupy speakers to their classrooms. This is a violation of the professional discretion and academic freedom of teachers. Obviously, the permission of parents and the school principal is not always required when guest speakers come to class. So why in this instance? Can the school district cite any occasion when a principal required a teacher to notify parents prior to a presentation from a representative of a Portland area business, a government agency, or the U.S. military? Are parents notified when teachers use Junior Achievement curriculum materials, funded by large corporations like UPS, ExxonMobil, and Goldman Sachs? Is it school district policy that only individuals who are engaged in social justice activism are so profoundly controversial and threatening that their presence in schools requires parental permission? And what message does this send to students, when one group is singled out as so potentially problematic? As educators, we object to this attack on academic freedom and the discriminatory enforcement of school district policies.

We believe that too often the standardized curriculum teaches a particular point of view and that it is important for educators to bring in groups like Occupy to offer our students greater curricular balance. For example, the Contemporary Economics textbook, adopted by PPS, teaches that income inequality is caused by differences in household sizes, that the best predictor of poverty is whether family members are employed, that welfare tends to create cycles of poverty, and that military spending has been decreasing while “income redistribution” has vastly increased. The global studies adoption, Modern World History, includes a single “critical writing” activity in its treatment of the war in Iraq: “Imagine you are a speechwriter for President Bush. Write the introductory paragraph of a speech to coalition forces after their victory in Iraq.” The text includes no critical perspectives from groups or individuals opposed to U.S. involvement in Iraq.The district should not place restrictions on teachers’ efforts to offer their students a rich and varied — and socially relevant — curriculum.

Lastly, the school district must live up to its commitment to equity. When one-fifth of PPS students live in poverty, one third in David Douglas and Parkrose live in poverty, and 55 percent of all American children live in families that are near poverty, we should be encouraging all teachers to invite Occupy activists into their classroom to discuss issues of inequality and social justice.

Signed,

  1. Roy Amling, Portland Public Schools Substitute
  2. Bill Bigelow, Portland Public Schools, retired; Curriculum Editor, Rethinking Schools magazine
  3. George Bishop, Roosevelt High School
  4. Gregory M. Burrill, Portland Public Schools Substitute
  5. Andrew Butterfield, Davinci Middle School
  6. Aaron G. Byer, Roosevelt High School
  7. Margaret Byrne, Vestal Elementary School
  8. Linda Campillo, Wilson High School
  9. John Carolan, Wilson High School
  10. Alice Chadd, Young Women’s Leadership Academy
  11. Kerri L Cheney, Duniway Elementary School
  12. David Child, Woodlawn School
  13. Michael Cullerton, Jefferson High School
  14. Diane Dean, Rosa Parks Elementary School
  15. Jeremy Dickerson, Roosevelt High School
  16. Heather Dolberg, Wilson High School
  17. Sandy Donnely, Mary Rieke Elementary School
  18. Kasuna Duffey, Astor School
  19. Gail Duffy, Wilson High School
  20. Margot Faegre, Scott School
  21. Paula Fahey, Stephenson Elementary School
  22. Amy Feller, Wilson High School
  23. Hannah Flinn, Lee School
  24. Lise Flores, Wilson High School
  25. David Frankunas, Grout Elementary School
  26. Del Gerber, Wilson High School
  27. Tracy Groom, Wilson High School
  28. Terri Harrington, Portland Association of Teachers Vice President, Maplewood School
  29. Theresa Hawkins, Franklin High School
  30. Keith Higbee, Wilson High School
  31. Melia Hinatsu, Irvington School
  32. Annete Holbrook, Marysville School
  33. Michael Horrigan, James John Elementary School
  34. Aurora M. Jimenez, King School
  35. Kimberly Johnson, Markham Elementary School
  36. Lisa Orcutt Kane, Abernethy Elementary School
  37. Suzanna M. Keller, Cesar Chavez School
  38. Jeff Kipilman, Portland Public Schools Substitute
  39. Linea King, English as a Second Language, Teacher On Special Assignment
  40. Joana Kirchhoff, Rigler School
  41. Kathi Koeing, Portland Association of Teachers
  42. Dan Kropp, James John Elementary School
  43. Barbara Kutasz, Mt. Tabor School
  44. Kali Landis, Lee School
  45. Dianne Leahy, Jefferson High School
  46. Dominic LeFave, Wilson High School
  47. Danielle Liscia, Wilson High School
  48. Tim Loveless, Wilson High School
  49. Derek MacDicken, Wilson High School
  50. Manuel Mateo, Wilson High School
  51. Geri Ellen Matyiko, Pioneer Program at Holladay
  52. Elizabeth Mayer, Roseway Heights School
  53. Andrea J. McCarter, Creative Science School
  54. Karen McEwan, Woodmere Elementary School
  55. Tom McKenna, Portland Public Schools, retired
  56. Rose Michels, Woodlawn School
  57. Merrie Miller, Kelly Elementary School
  58. Alex Montfort, King School
  59. Molly Mullins, Harrison Park School
  60. Hyung Nam, Wilson High School
  61. Mike Nolan, Wilson High School
  62. Jeanne O’Brien, Ainsworth Elementary School
  63. Mary R.J. O’Hara, Creative Science School
  64. Ric Oleksak, Sellwood School
  65. Matthew Oleson, Beach School
  66. Steve O’Neil, Wilson High School
  67. Juliana O’Neill, Lincoln High School
  68. Susan Parker, Wilson High School
  69. Patty Patterson, Maplewood School
  70. Katherine A. Paxton-Williams, Rigler School
  71. George Penk, Wilson High School
  72. Shyla Piper, Irvington School
  73. Michelle Potesteo, Wilson High School
  74. Leslie Quenell, Rigler School
  75. Al Rabchuk, Wilson High School
  76. Casey Rodhe, Chapman School
  77. Robert Rodney, Stephenson Elementary School
  78. Stephen B. Rosenfeld, Portland Public Schools Substitute
  79. Adam Sanchez, Jefferson High School
  80. Jeremy Shelter, Wilson High School
  81. Debra Simmons, Portland Association of Teachers
  82. Cathy Skach, Benson High School
  83. Greg Smith, Lewis & Clark College, Teacher Education
  84. Sarah Spella, Jefferson High School Motor Development Team
  85. Patty Stanich, Maplewood School
  86. Geoff Stonecipher, Woodmere Elementary School
  87. Eric Alan Swehla, Mary Rieke Elementary School
  88. Sherree Tatum, Bridger School
  89. Marcia E. Thomason, Astor School
  90. RaeAnn Thompson, Young Women’s Leadership Academy
  91. Ailien Tran, Winterhaven School
  92. Rose Wilde, George Middle School
  93. Lisa Walker, Wilson High School
  94. Margaret Ann Walter, Wilson High School
  95. Anny Wood, Ockley Green School

The authors of this statement encourages interested parties to sign their petition at: http://www.change.org/petitions/portland-public-schools-change-policy-restricting-teachers-inviting-speakers-into-their-classrooms

 We have additional signatures through our ongoing online petition (includes a few duplicates from PPS teachers who signed online as well as in person). As of December 19, 11pm.

Hyung Nam Portland OR
Dominic Le Fave Portland OR
Bill Bigelow Portland OR
Hayley Nasman Portland OR
Kris  Alman Portland OR
Jennifer Schuberth Portland OR
Anthony Cody Oakland CA
Antonio  Angel Barragan Glen Allen VA
Karie Mize Monmouth OR
Michael Charney North Kingsville OH
Kevin Donahoe Miamisburg OH
Deborah Menkart Washington, DC DC
Jon Spinac New York NY
Sara LaPlante Olympia WA
yirusha Isreal wheaton MD
Donna  Mace Green Cove Springs FL
Benjamin Burson Gresham OR
Sandy Polishuk Portland OR
Christine  White Portland OR
Nona Glazer Portland OR
liam Doherty Portland OR
Mark Nerys Brooklyn NY
Eric Gregory Portland OR
Frann  Michel Portland OR
Michelle Newsum Coos Bay OR
Terry Anderson Portland OR
David  Lifton Portland OR
chris peterson Portland OR
Devin Post Portland OR
Bob Peterson Milwaukee WI
Joshua Weiner Portland OR
Hugo du Coudray Portland OR
CJ Mitchell South Pasadena CA
Kurt Kessler Ashland OR
Josh  Barstow Troutdale OR
E A Lake Oswego OR
Joel Morgan Portland OR
Laurie Sonnenfeld Portland OR
Rob Melton Portland OR
Alan Moore Portland OR
Forrest Loder Portland OR
Alon Raab Portland OR
Melissa Crenshaw Portland OR
Sarah Morrigan Portland OR
Sam Aley Coos Bay OR
Sonja Somerville Salem OR
Danielle  Sanders Portland OR
laurie&dave king Portland OR
Amy Warren Portland OR
Chadderton Taggard Portland OR
Gail Pearlman Grants Pass OR
David Dugo Portland OR
Isaac Ellis Portland OR
Susan Barrett Portland OR
Joel Sjerven portland OR
Katrina Wilson Salem OR
Juliet Ballard Portland OR
Laura Guimond Portland OR
liberty straney portland OR
Kirk Caudle Portland OR
Doug Sherman Portland OR
Laura Lovett 97023 OR
james m nordlund Fargo ND
Audrey  Dentith San Antonio TX
Thelma Stone Portland OR
Amani Al-holail Carbondale IL
Harrison Delfin Portland OR
Jess Brooks Portland OR
Kevin Finney Portland OR
Clayton Morgareidge Portland OR
Roy Perez Portland OR
Tina Burdsall Vancouver WA
kim boylan portland OR
Gaetano DeLeonibus Portland OR
Joseph Carr Portland OR
chuck  reinhart highland lakes NJ
mikeal slama cornelius OR
Deborah Norton Portland OR
Becky Lambert Victoria  
George Bishop Ridgefield WA
bill resnick Portland OR
David Osborn Portland OR
Upgeya Pew Vancouver WA
Alejandra Favela Portland OR
Barbara Henson La Mesa CA
Theresa Fagin Portland OR
Lance Garland Portland OR
Christopher Z White Portland OR
Helen Clarke Portland OR
Patrick Pinkerton Monmouth OR
Jeffrey Evans Tucson AZ
Heather Macdonald Jacksonville OR
Tom Kane Hubbard OR
Laura Stirewalt Portland OR
Elizabeth Lehr Portland OR
Ryan Olson Portland OR
Karen Bishop Portland OR
b Hoppe portland OR
phyllis weih portland OR
angella davis Portland OR
Theodora Tsongas Portland OR
Natasha Beck Portland OR
Emily Crum Portland OR
Matthew Reeder Portland OR
Pam Hogeweide Portland OR
Rose Hogeweide Portland OR
Mary-Jane  Freemont Portland OR
Adam Sanchez Portland OR
Tim  King Portland OR
Danica Fierman Portland OR
John Gouvas Athens  
Kathi Boyd Chicago IL
S Perrault Davis CA
Kathy Garrett Portland OR
Mary Twombly Cook WA
Rebecca Anshell Song San Diego CA
Marsha Rakestraw Portland OR
Lise  Jones Portland OR
Edward  Laurson Denver CO
Nancy Mueller Milwaukee WI
anonymous b nunyabizness MO
Aida Aranda FOREST GROVE OR
Scott Ritchie Atlanta GA
scott mahood portland OR
Paul Dean Portland OR
Andrea townsend Portland OR
Carol Miille Milwaukie OR
Malaina Guzman Portland OR
Adela Aguilar MONMOUTH OR
Rita Moore Portland OR
Daryl Caggiano Boston MA
Kym Cooke Portland OR
Lyra Butler-Denman Portland OR
Alex Stegner Portland OR
Courtney Von Drehle Portland OR
Laurie Mercier portland OR
Pat Muller Wilsonville OR
Swapna Mukhopadhyay Portland OR
Jeff Jansen Portland OR
Laura Seeton Portland OR
Tom Conry Portland OR
Cari Coe Portland OR
Mark  Oldani Portland OR
Bruce Bennett Pacifica CA
Sandy GENTILOTTI CHADDS FORD PA
kelly balderson Portland OR
Martin  Hart-Landsberg Portland OR
Julia Sanders Portland OR
Jean Eilers Portland OR
Sheila Golden Portland OR
Patricia Conway Portland OR
bethany dierickx Portland OR
Nathan Goldbaum Chicago IL
Alan Haggard San Diego CA
Cassie Sorensen Portland OR
Ryan Coons Edinboro PA
Anne Morin Portland OR

 

 

Protest Arne Duncan Wednesday

in

Dear Portland Area Rethinking Schools friends,

This Wednesday, please join Oregon Save Our Schools to protest the corporate education reform agenda, exemplified (and pushed) by Sec. of Education Arne Duncan, who will be in town.

From our friends at Oregon SOS:

WHEN: WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12 AT 6:00PM
WHERE: OREGON CONVENTION CENTER, 777 NE MLK, JR. BLVD., PORTLAND


STOP THE CORPORATE ATTACK ON EDUCATION!
PROTEST ARNE DUNCAN!
 
Unfortunately, the Obama administration is carrying on the worst aspects of the Bush education policies and pushing unproven, risky, and profit-driven "reforms.” Obama and his Education Secretary Arne Duncan dangle money in front of cash-starved state governments with their "Race to the Top" program to demand corporate reforms including more charter schools — which, at best, perform no better than regular schools and often much worse— and more high-stakes testing that takes time away from true instruction, and have been proven by study after study to hurt quality education!
 
Arne Duncan made a name for himself in Chicago by pushing the corporate agenda and privatizing schools at a rate of about 10 per year. As the U.S. Secretary of Education, he touted the wholesale privatization of public schools and the breaking of the teachers' union after Hurricane Katrina as "the best thing that happened to the education system in New Orleans." He applauded the firing of every single teacher at Central Falls, a high poverty high school in Rhode Island. Now Arne Duncan is coming to Portland to give the keynote address for the Oregon Business Association’s 2011 Statesman Dinner. It’s time for Arne to listen to students, parents and educators not CEOs!
 
Oregon SOS Demands:
• Equitable Funding For All Public Schools
• An End To High Stakes Testing Used For The Purpose Of Student, Teacher, And School Evaluation
• Teacher, Family And Community Leadership In Forming Public Education Policies
 
You can find us on Facebook at Oregon SOS or email for more info at
 OregonSOSinfo@gmail.com

Register now for Social Justice conf/car pooling?

in

Dear Portland Area Rethinking Schools friends,

Now is the time to register for the Northwest Teaching for Social Justice conference -- coming up next Saturday, Oct. 1, at Chief Sealth International High School in Seattle: www.nwtsj.org.

Resources, ideas, inspiration.

If you have a ride to offer or need a ride from the Portland area, please email me at bill@rethinkingschools.org, and I'll get you in touch.

See you in Seattle.

Best, Bill

Bill Bigelow
for the Northwest Teaching for Social Justice conference steering committee

Teaching Social Justice Conference

in

Dear Portland Area Rethinking Schools friends,

We hope you can make the trek to Seattle this October 1 for the 4th annual Northwest Teaching for Social Justice conference. Register at www.nwtsj.org

Lots of Rethinking Schools writers and editors will be presenting: Linda Christensen, Stan Karp, Wayne Au, Tim Swinehart, Özlem Sensoy, Adam Sanchez, Jeff Edmundson, Brian Gibbs, Elizabeth Schlessman, Tom McKenna, Ann Truax, Alison Schmitke, Mark Hansen, Katharine Johnson, (me, too.) -- We'll have more than 60 outstanding workshops from educators all around the region. And dozens of community organizations will display their wares at the Resource Fair.

RS editor Stan Karp's presentation is "Challenging Corporate School Reform," and will follow up on the well-received talk he gave in Portland last year. 

Please register by Sept. 25, so that we can order the correct number of meals.

For those of you who were at Madison High School last year, remember how wonderful it was to connect with other educators who still have hope and good humor, and are struggling to make things better. As Kiana Weinschenk of Tacoma wrote on her conference evaluation: "It is both a thrill and a pleasure to be surrounded by so many people who, unabashedly and unapologetically, put themselves on the line each and every day for their students."

Check out www.nwtsj.org, and join us for the 4th annual Northwest Teaching for Social Justice conference.

See you there.

Bill Bigelow (bill@rethinkingschools.org)
for the Portland Area Rethinking Schools steering committee

NW Teaching for Social Justice Conference

in

Dear Portland Area Rethinking Schools friends,

Welcome back. No doubt, this will be another year filled with both joys and challenges -- and educators of conscience will need one another. As many of you know, last year's NWTSJ conference was exciting, informative, and inspirational. This year's conference, Sat. Oct. 1 in Seattle at Chief Sealth International High School, promises to be our best ever. Please go to www.nwtsj.org and register now. We're just over a month away!

Here's a sampling of the more than 60 workshops we'll be offering:

Using Scandal to Create Inquiry-based Discussion
Stories of Subversion: Mathematics in Action
Honoring Our Ancestors: Bringing Students' Lives into Our Classrooms
Helping Undocumented Students Get to College
Gender and Sexuality 101
Nature and Labor: From Disposability to Sustainability
Do Your Students Know Enough to Go to War?
Unpacking the Ode

Our keynoter is Karen Lewis, president of the Chicago Teachers Union: 
"Moving Toward Social Justice in these Hostile Times"

Special guest presenter: Stan Karp, Rethinking Schools editor and coordinator of the "Not Waiting for Superman" project

Also, throughout the day, nonprofit organizations from around the region will be displaying their wares at our Resource Fair -- including a full selection of Rethinking Schools materials. Be a part of this fabulous event. 

www.nwtsj.org

See you October 1st.

Bill Bigelow (bill@rethinkingschools.org)
for the Portland Area Rethinking Schools steering committee

P.S. The conference is co-sponsored by Puget Sound Rethinking Schools, Portland Area Rethinking Schools, Olympia Educators for Social Justice, Coalition X (Tacoma), and Rethinking Schools magazine.

Northwest Teaching for Social Justice Conference in Seattle

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Dear Portland Area Rethinking Schools friends,

Those of you who attended the Northwest Teaching for Social Justice conference at Portland's Madison High School last year know that the gathering was filled with imagination, new ideas, humanity, and hope. Almost 800 people attended. This coming October 1st (a Saturday) we'll reconvene at Chief Sealth International High School in Seattle. We have an extraordinary program. Once again, we'll offer more than 60 lively workshops from teachers, teacher educators, and education activists. We've invited back some of the most popular sessions from years past, and will have many new ones. It will be worth the trip north.

We also have two special speakers. Keynoting in the morning will be Karen Lewis, president of the Chicago Teachers Union, who will be talking on "Moving Toward Social Justice in These Hostile Times." And we've just added Rethinking Schools editorStan Karp to the program. Stan has coordinated Rethinking Schools' "Not Waiting for Superman" project and will be speaking in the afternoon. If you missed Stan when he spoke at Jefferson last year, you'll want to catch him in Seattle.

And our day-long Resource Fair will allow you to connect with organizations doing vital social justice work throughout the Northwest.

Don't miss this opportunity to join with other educators to draw knowledge and inspiration -- and to remind ourselves why we are doing this essential work with young people.

Register now at www.nwtsj.org.

Thanks for all you do.

Bill Bigelow for the Portland Area Rethinking Schools steering committee
bill@rethinkingschools.org

The Northwest Teaching for Social Justice conference is organized by Puget Sound Rethinking Schools (Seattle), Coalition X (Tacoma), Olympia Educators for Social Justice, Portland Area Rethinking Schools, and Rethinking Schools magazine.

          

Portland Area Rethinking Schools has a 30+ year history of working to support public education and progressive reform in the schools. We are teachers, parents, students, community activists and teacher educators who believe excellent and equitable public schools are essential for all students to reach their potential and for the creation of a just and democratic society.